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Salon de la marginalité

From the beginning, Les Filles électriques has tried to make room for alternative artists and voices from the fringe. Our main event, the FVA, is no exception. In 2005 and 2006, we introduced something called the Salon de la Marginalité (Fringe Salon), an event held Saturday afternoon at the Sala Rossa, bringing together some 30 new publishing houses, small magazines and community groups. But it was all a little hard to organize and manage, given our modest budget. Last year, we had to abandon the project, which bothered and saddened us (that goes with the territory for Les Filles électriques!). This year we’re resurrecting it in a different format. Every day, from 4 to 8 pm at the Galerie Espace, artists (alone or in a group) have been invited to help us discover their work. We give them the space, and the rest is up to them. And to you. It’s free and a good way to find out more about the myriad facets of the community, get involved and create some solidarity. Don’t hesitate to suggest ideas for next year.

February 2

4:00 pm

Rassemblement de nouveaux éditeurs et de jeunes revues

Free admission

It’s the BOOKMAGSUPERFAIR! The small fair for great presses, featuring Éditions Rodrigol, Oie de Cravan, Quartannier, Poètes de Brousse, Mille Putois, Les Éditions de ta Mère, Ectropion and others. Yes, space will be tight but it’s a brilliant opportunity to discover the publications that big stores and chains don’t carry. And a chance to chat up editors and publishers at small presses, since they’re all too poor to hire staff and will probably be there to meet, greet — and sell — in person.

February 3

4:00 pm

Rassemblement de nouveaux éditeurs et de jeunes revues

Free admission

Same event as February 2.

February 4

4:00 pm

Karen Spencer

Free admission

In English. Performer Karen Spencer performs (in English). A wanderer, loiterer, rider of trains and circulator of dreams, she takes the mundane events of ordinary life and finds their poetry, taking the time to take time. She has exhibited at artist-run centres in Canada and Europe. Her favourite performance place is the street.

For her Dream Listener/Porteur de rêves project, she spent a year on the street using found cardboard on which she wrote her dreams. It became a way of encountering street people and penetrating the dream life of others in a direct creative process. Karen also spent the time developing relationships with people at risk at the St-James Drop-In Centre in Montreal.

February 5

4:00 pm

Jacinthe Loranger, artiste visuelle

Free admission

Visual artist Jacinthe Loranger presents her work. We met this girl a few years ago when she was working at the Casa del Popolo as a waitress. Then we found out she was also, and especially, a terrific visual artist with some unbelievably original work. It was that simple. We like what she does and we offered her space for one day in the Salon de la marginalité. We have no idea what she’s going to show, since she has so many talents. But we’re behind it all the way.

February 6

4:00 pm

Projet Autochtone du Québec

Free admission

Projet Autochtone du Québec (PAQ) is a homeless shelter for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, in operation for the past four years. It is open to both men and women, ages 16 to 80. PAQ was set up to give Aboriginal people a place where they could meet others from their community and speak their own languages in peace.

The event is in two parts. First, Paul Rivet, a young Innu and community service provider, will tell us about PAQ and show videos by young people in the Wapikoni Mobile project. In part two, Donald Tremblay, an Innu and residential school survivor, will tell us about his experience. It’s an exceptional opportunity to find out more about the difficulties faced by Aboriginal people, who are also members of the larger intercultural community.

You can reach PAQ at 514-879-3310 (evenings are best).

February 7

4:00 pm

Diane Trépanière reçoit — 1

Diane Trépanière

Free admission

Community artist Diane Trépanière hosts members of Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal and l’Arrêt-Source, who will be showing their writing and photographs.

Women at risk need dreams and beauty too. There are numerous organizations well placed to meet their physical and psychological needs, so Les Filles électriques wanted to complement the existing services with opportunities to create art. For three years, we have been working towards that goal with Diane Trépanière. Thanks to her commitment of time and generosity we have been able to publish two wonderful books in partnership with women’s shelters. The books are Écrire et sans pitié (Éditions du Passage, 2006) with l’Arrêt-source, and ABCd’art de La rue des Femmes (Remue-ménage, 2007), with Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal.

Diane Trépanière is a multidisciplinary artist. Trained in photography, she has exhibited in numerous collective shows, as well as mounting four solo exhibitions. In 1999, she created a photographic installation in memory of the fourteen victims of the Polytechnique tragedy, and in 2000, for the World March of Women, she created another memorial in Montreal’s Émilie-Gamelin park. She has published Des pas sur l’ombre (Remue-ménage, 2004), a collection of texts by community shelter workers. Her work has been shown in artist-run centres, galleries and Maisons de la culture in Quebec. For several years, she has been conducting photography and writing workshops at Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal and writing workshops at l’Arrêt —Source.

Since its founding in 1994, Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal has been welcoming homeless women at risk, and helping them through the process of healing and regaining power over their lives. The organization privileges creative expression as a means of social reconstruction and inclusion.

Besides offering a bed, food and physical security to young women between the ages of 18 and 30, L’Arrêt-Source provides coaching and support for up to two years.

February 8

4:00 pm

Diane Trépanière reçoit — 2

Free admission

Community artist Diane Trépanière hosts members of Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal and l’Arrêt-Source, who will be showing their writing and photographs.

Women at risk need dreams and beauty too. There are numerous organizations well placed to meet their physical and psychological needs, so Les Filles électriques wanted to complement the existing services with opportunities to create art. For three years, we have been working towards that goal with Diane Trépanière. Thanks to her commitment of time and generosity we have been able to publish two wonderful books in partnership with women’s shelters. The books are Écrire et sans pitié (Éditions du Passage, 2006) with l’Arrêt-source, and ABCd’art de La rue des Femmes (Remue-ménage, 2007), with Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal.

Diane Trépanière is a multidisciplinary artist. Trained in photography, she has exhibited in numerous collective shows, as well as mounting four solo exhibitions. In 1999, she created a photographic installation in memory of the fourteen victims of the Polytechnique tragedy, and in 2000, for the World March of Women, she created another memorial in Montreal’s Émilie-Gamelin park. She has published Des pas sur l’ombre (Remue-ménage, 2004), a collection of texts by community shelter workers. Her work has been shown in artist-run centres, galleries and Maisons de la culture in Quebec. For several years, she has been conducting photography and writing workshops at Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal and writing workshops at l’Arrêt —Source.

Since its founding in 1994, Herstreet/La rue des Femmes de Montréal has been welcoming homeless women at risk, and helping them through the process of healing and regaining power over their lives. The organization privileges creative expression as a means of social reconstruction and inclusion.

Besides offering a bed, food and physical security to young women between the ages of 18 and 30, L’Arrêt-Source provides coaching and support for up to two years.